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how brown trout came to America

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20

Aug

2016

trout

Brown trout are originally native across a large portion of Europe and western Asia. In the 1800s, Europeans began farming brown trout for food and to support recreational fishing. The availability of brown trout eggs and fry led to the introduction of brown trout in colonial areas around the world, so that the Europeans living there would have some familiar recreation and food source to enjoy. It was during this time period and onwards that brown trout were introduced to the United States, as well as Australia, New Zealand, India, Patagonia, and parts of Africa.

The first American brown trout were introduced to Michigan and New York in 1883 through two fish hatcheries. They came mainly from a German strain of eggs, and old timers will sometime refer to brown trout as “German trout” in the US. They were thought to be particularly valuable because they grow faster and can withstand higher water temperatures than rainbow or brook trout, and therefore made sense for aquacultural purposes.
amberjack journal

uh oh!Testicle biting Fish

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19

Aug

2016

teethPhoto: This red-bellied pacu recently caught in Denmark could be a sign that the fish is invading Scandinavian waters. (Henrik Carl via FoxNews.com)
The creature in question is a red-bellied pacu, and is native to the Amazon. Pictures of the freaky fish frequently make the rounds of inboxes because of its strangely human-looking teeth.

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water, a cousin of the piranha reported to go after swimmer’s testicles has been found in coastal waters between Sweden and Denmark. And fish experts are warning locals to stay aware — in order to stay whole.

Don’t let your goldfish swim with the fishes

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18

Aug

2016

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BY JOHNNY LIEU
1 DAY AGO
You may think dumping goldfish into a river is a harmless act, but in reality the fish can become destructively big.

Researchers from the Centre of Fish and Fisheries at Murdoch University have been trying to control goldfish for 12 years in the Vasse River, located in the southwest of Western Australia.
An invasive species, the goldfish is causing havoc for native fish and its surrounding ecosystem, which is why Stephen Beatty and his fellow researchers spent a year studying the little-known movement patterns of the goldfish in the wild. The results of the study, now concluded, has been published in a paper in the journal, Ecology of Freshwater Fish.

Read Full Story on Mashable

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